Autumn Landscape: Layering watercolour

Layering watercolour (glazing) is a great way to add depth to a painting. But it needs to be done with confidence and careful consideration. If you use the wrong colours, the end result is flat. If your brushstrokes are not delicate enough, you risk muddying the painting.

Through the Gap. Watercolour by Vandy Massey
Through the Gap. Watercolour by Vandy Massey

There’s a particular bench at Wandlebury Country Park  that provides a wonderful view all the way to the horizon. You just need to know where to look between the rows of tall trees.  Last October, in the midst of autumns most incandescent glow, I spent a day painting up on the rise at Wandlebury. Between the trees the fields create a patchwork of textures and colours, framed by the ragged curtain of branches on either side.

Layering watercolour: the stages

The light was changing quickly so I used a series of mid tone washes to block out the different levels of the view. A three-colour scumbly wash over the tree areas produced a basic sense of the branch sections without adding any definition or much tonal value (left hand tree).

My next step in layering watercolour was to add wash of clear water on the right hand tree and then drop in the same three colours in greater intensity, allowing them to blend and granulate. I used this to start defining branch shapes and areas of the tree that would be in shadow.

Layering Watercolour 1 Work in progress by Vandy Massey

The fields are the area of interest in the painting so they are painted with more definition. Layering watercolour here helps you to create some clearly texturing in the middle ground fields and in the foreground hedge.

Layering Watercolour 2 - Work in progress by Vandy Massey

The final step was to add a glaze to the left hand tree. Once the painting was well dried,  I used a sword brush tip to added branches in the trees. I decided to knock back the colour at the far end of the tree as it receded. You can see the final painting in the first picture of the post.

Through the Gap. (See first image in the post). An autumn landscape painted from an underpainting done plein air at Wandlebury Park.

Valentines Day painting – for friends

Valentines Day painting

This little Valentines Day painting was done on Saturday – but didn’t get around to posting it.  In Finland and Estonia Valentines Day is celebrated as a friendship day, rather than one of romantic love.  So despite living in England, I’m posting this in the spirit of Finland and Estonia’s Valentines Day tradition.

If you want to know a bit more about how this Valentines Day painting was done, I’ll be posting it to the Wash a Week Challenge blog.

Another Valentines Day painting:

And as its traditional to give flowers, I’m also sharing one that makes me smile. Sun Worshipers evokes hot summers days – just around the corner for us now that we’ve passed winter’s midpoint.

These are my Valentines Day paintings for you, dear blog readers. Hope this year brings much love into your life.

 

Sunflower watercolour

 

Painting atmospheric skies

For many artists there’s something quite seductive about a big, wide sky filled with clouds.  Painting atmospheric skies is something that calls us.Painting atmospheric skies

We all love a clear blue summer sky, but visually, they’re just not as interesting as one that’s filled with clouds. They lack something special – big moody atmosphere!

Painting atmospheric skies on two continents

The sunsets over Istanbul are spectacular. Its the combination of the sky line and the water seem to work perfectly together to create that atmospheric sky.  When in Istanbul, I can recommend a ferry ride across the Bosphorus at the end of the day. If you judge your time just right, you get to see the perfect harmony – and that’s what makes an artist want to get painting atmospheric skies.

Paintings atmospheric skies 2 And then there’s a sunrise sky in the United States. This painting is derived from a photograph sent to me by an athletic friend who noticed the beauty of the water and sky during his morning run in Wilmington.  The first attempt to capture the serenity of the scene was in pure watercolour. This first small Wilmington painting and the view from the Bosphorus image were both done for RunningWithBrushes

Painting atmospheric skies  - morning run

The mixed media version of the image took longer – it’s had a number of laters applied to get the right textures.  Its darker, and moodier, and it certainly has atmosphere. There’s a sort of ‘noir’ feeling about the final image. And despite being derived from the same photograph, they have very different feelings. Same water. Same sky. Different colours. Different textures. Very different mood.

Istanbul Watercolours – influences remain

Last weekends colours and images have stayed with me and are reflected in more Istanbul watercolours this week (at least influenced by something from Istanbul if not a painting of Istanbul itself.

The sights, smells and sounds of the city are more than memorable. The streets are filled wit vendors – of hot roast chestnuts and freshly squeezed juices (orange, grapefruit and pomegranate). Seagulls by the thousand shriek incessantly as they follow the ferries, looking for offerings from commuters. Beautiful sunsets across the water, silhouetting the towers and minarets of the mosques and the museums. And then there’s the intense (almost to the point of sensory overload) sights and sounds of the markets, the historic buildings, and the interiors of the palace.

Istanbul Watercolours – Colour

Luminous Turquoise features in Istanbul watercolours

Blue is the dominant colour of the wall decorations. Ancient turquoise tiles, beautifully hand painted adorn vast areas of wall space in the Topkai Palace, the Blue Mosque and Ayasofya.  I had the urge to paint in Turquoise this week. Lori always says that the colours you wear influence the colours you paint. This may be because you see them all the time while you’re wearing them. It’s certainly true that turquoise tones and teals are my favourite colours. I wear them a lot and they often feature in my paintings. Watching the Ray is part of my Wash a Week Challenge for this week, and will be making an appearance on Running With Brushes very soon.

Istanbul watercolour skyline

The sunsets over the Bosphorus are wonderful. Clouds waft across orange and pink skies revealing the many towers and minarets across the city silhouetted elegantly  in windows of colour. A little sketch in my colour journal captures the image and will always remind me of a ferry ride across the water, looking back towards the old city at sunset.

Artfinder news

I’ve continued gradually sorting through paintings and refreshing my Artfinder portfolio. It has been sorely neglected and I find there are many paintings on my walls which haven’t yet found themselves onto the Artfinder page. The update will continue over the next few weeks.

Two paintings went up this week – both abstracts:

VMW050 Outeniqua Mountain Mist - blog

Outeniqua Mountain Mist was painted from the platform of a treehouse as I looked out over the mountain range in the distance.

VMW073 - Rain and Spray blogRain and Spray is exactly what it says on the can – a study of water in various states. Specifically, water in motion as rain and as ocean spray.

 

Istanbul Art – Echoes of the Ottoman Empire

This has been a weekend of Istanbul Art for me. I love travelling and these days, new places are quite often also a source of new visual inspiration. This was absolutely the case with Istanbul.

This is a city with so many facets. To start with, it spans two continents. We are staying in Eastern Europe, and last night, popped across the river to have supper – in Asia. I love the idea that this city has one half in Europe and the other in Asia.  And the two sections couldn’t be more different in feel. The European side houses the old city and features the historic buildings we all know about. The Asian side is buzzy and modern and features rows of contemporary pavement restaurants and English language schools. Both side are fun – in a very different way.

My Istanbul Art

We’ve had so many places to see in only a few days so my own art has consisted of a few sketches. There will be more when I get home though. My head is filled with image and ideas.

Istanbul Art - Grand Bazaar
The alleyways of the Grand Bazaar are festooned with bags, clothes and many-coloured wares of all varieties

The Grand Bazaar is worth a visit – but expect to be constantly asked to come and look at goods. Every shop seems to employ someone to stand at the door and entice customers in – and they can be quite persistent. Its not so surprising when you realise that there are around 5000 (Yes, five thousand. That’s not a typo) shops in the bazaar and many of them sell the same sort of goods.  The shops are sometimes no more than stalls, but every one is crammed with wares. This covered market dates back to 1461 and the vaulted ceilings are all painted with complex ancient patterns in yellow, green, blue and red.

Istanbul Art - Blue Mosque
Rough sketch of the blue mosque domes seen from the steps of Ayasofia

The Blue Mosque and the Ayasofia are both on everyone’s ‘must see when visiting Istanbul’ lists. And now that I’ve seen them, I can understand why.  We saw both on one day and my preferred one of the two was the Ayasofia, simply because it has such a fascinating and complex history which shows in the building.  In a busy day, I sat on the steps for 10 minutes after visiting these two impressive buildings, and tried to capture the imposing feel of the Blue Mosque in my sketchbook.

More about Istanbul art in a future post.

Wash a Week Challenge – Back to the Quinacridones

This is Week 5 of the Wash a Week Challenge and I’m exploring Quinacridone Purple and along with a different type of sponge for painting.

Enchanted forest watercolour on www.runningwithbrushes.com

Watercolour Plans and Explorations

This week has been one of watercolour plans and some explorations.

Watercolour plan 1 : Open Studios

Watercolour plan 1: The start of the week brought paperwork for Open Studios – and the requirement to make some commitments to painting fresh work and exhibiting. I’ve decided to do both Saffron Walden Open studios at the end of April and beginning of May, and Cambridge Open Studios in July. More on these closer to the time.

Watercolour plan 2 :  Artfinder

Watercolour plan 2: I took a decision to do a blitz sale on Artfinder to make space for new works in preparation for these exhibitions. This has proved quite successful so far and 5 paintings went over the past few days. It’s often quite difficult to see a painting go – we become attached to them somehow. But I’m excited about developing new lines of work this year and this will spur me on to get my brushes going.

Watercolour Exploration 1: Wash a Week Challenge

This week’s post explores Daniel Smith’s Lunar Blue. Here’s a little abstract treescape painting I did using only this colour. This will go up on the Running With Brushes site when I have time to post it there. (Life is overtaking me a bit at the moment.)

Watercolour exploration - wash a week entry
Wash a week – Week 4 – Lunar Blue

Following Last weeks Wash a Week post on Quinacridone Gold and Quinacridone Violet, I was asked how similar the gold is to Indian Yellow. I happen to have a tube of Indian Yellow I hadn’t yet tried. Perfect excuse to have a go so here’s the little colour swatch I did to see the difference. Separately, they do look quite similar because they are both strong colours. Put them together and you can see the difference.
Watercolour week yellow and gold comparison

Watercolour Exploration 2: Abstracts

On Friday evening I went to the monthly meeting of the Saffron Walden Art Society to see a demonstration of Abstract painting by local artist Joyce Crabb. I’m increasingly interested in Abstract art, and I think probably lean towards semi-abstract myself in some of my looser work. I’m not sure I’ll get comfortable with pure abstract work – at least not for some while, if ever. But I will be experimenting a bit more on the fringes I suspect.

Watercolour Plans 3: Tidying up the studio

I’m a book junkie (and a colour junkie as I’ve said before). I have a fair collection of art books and magazines in my studio. When I set up the space for my painting I insisted on having a corner with a sofa and table, as well as a bookshelf, so that I could sit quietly and enjoy dipping into this exciting reference material and inspiration.

Watercolour plan - tidy the studio

 

A year or so ago, I did a workshop in oil painting with Stephen Higton and decided to start doing a bit of work in other mediums, so I bought a large easel, amongst other things. Its fabulous to have it, but in a small studio, it was always a bit in the way. No matter which way I positioned it, the bookshelf was obscured and it became a mission to reach it.  Result: books not read, or books and magazines stacked all over the sofa and any other free surface so I could get to them.

This weekend I had a brainwave about repositioning things and got stuck in to moving furniture before I got started on painting. The result:

Watercolour plan - after the tidy
Space to read!

My Secret Project: a Sneak Preview

I’ve been working on a secret project for a little while. It’s still a secret so I’m not going to tell you everything about it yet. But I just couldn’t wait to share the paintings I’ve been doing for it – so here’s a little sneak preview.

Secret Narnia Project - Abstract version
Abstract version

As usual, my method has been to think about the project for some months. While I do that, vague images start to crystalise in my mind. These are the first two sketches for the project. I think there will be more. In fact I’m sure there will be more paintings before my secret project is done – I have a few images in my head already.

One red tree
Secret Narnia Project – One Red Tree

There have been a few criteria to this project.

In the first place, it has to be predominantly, if not exclusively, deep red and grey/silver. Black might be an option as an extra colour or an alternative within the design.

The paintings need to have a feel of winter, but not be literal. This is an exercise in abstraction within a theme.

It has to appeal to a special person in my family. At the moment, the initial deliberations are in progress and some decisions will be forthcoming soon.

Next steps in my Secret Project:

– More paintings

– Finding a supplier who will screen print a small run of fabric

– You’ll have to wait to find out the rest….

I know which of these two I prefer – I’d love to hear what you think.

South West Rocks inspires Spray on the Rocks

Spray on the Rocks (watercolour inspired by South West Rocks)
Spray on the Rocks (watercolour 27 x 39cm)

South West Rocks was the first stop on our road trip up the east coast of Australia a few years ago. We had to drive up the coast from Sydney to Byron Bay within 24 hours of doing the long haul flight from England. The plan was to do the 12 hour drive to meet up with Nic who was coming down the coast from Cairns. South West Rocks was roughly half way along the drive so chose this small coastal town as our overnight rest stop.

South West Rocks is situated at the mouth of the Macleay river and the estuary is a haven for waterbirds.  The colours were crisp and clear on this perfect day we spent there.

Rocks in South West Rocks

Whenever I’ve looked through my Marc’s photographs this image of the rocks near the beach have captivated me. I love the rich colours and striations. There’s aren’t too many places where you can stand below the trees and see them at this angle at the top of the rise. This outcrop was only about three metres high, but looks a fair amount higher.

South West Rocks painting inspiration

Spray on the Rocks uses the colours of the stones in South West Rocks. The combination of the clear blue sky, and the red tones in the rock race give the painting a feeling of summer heat. The waterfall is artistic licence – and is included to create a cool contrast to the warm areas of the painting. The misty foreground allows the viewer to see the rockface through the spray bringing the cooler feeling of the water closer to the forefront of the painting.

The South West Rocks have formed a cliff face in the painting, increasing the height so give a greater sense of distance to the trees at the top of the escarpment.

The original Spray on the Rocks painting will be on show at Saffron Walden Open Studios and a limited edition of fine art prints are available.

Advent Artist 3 – Sophia Khan

Cone Cluster (watercolour 4 x 6 inches)
Cone Cluster (watercolour 4 x 6 inches)

My old school friend, Karin Panaino-Petersen suggested on Facebook that we all give away something every day for 30 days. Since I’m doing my Advent Artist Challenge, I decided I would try and do a painting every day and give it away. I’m not sure whether I’ll make 30, but there will be a good series of Give Aways this month.Today’s give away details are here

Advent Artist for Day 3:

Today’s Advent Artist Share is Sophia Khan. Sophia is an architect who loves painting as she travels. She has a beautifully delicate touch, which is just perfect for the medium of watercolour. Have a look at Sophia’s gallery or follow her Facebook Page

Advent 2 – Spoiled for Choice

Spoiled for Choice (watercolour 4 x 6 inches)
Spoiled for Choice (watercolour 4 x 6 inches)

This little painting is my December GiveAway for day 2. Click here to find out what you need to do to be in the draw

Today’s Advent Artist is Rhonda Carpenter who blogs at Watercolors and Words.

Rhonda is so generous with the shares of her workshop experiences and exhibition news. Recently, Rhonda shared her perspective workshop drawings so I though this painting would be an appropriate one for the post about Rhonda’s website. I was really impressed and inspired by the skill on her exercises – so I decided it was time to do a painting that consider perspective in a more direct way.

Rhonda’s blog is a treasury of information and a great way to discover the websites of new artists. This is a bit of payback for Rhonda – hope you enjoy reading her blog as much as I do. It’s one I never miss.

If you want to nominate an artist whose work you like, share the love by adding them in a link below this post (or in a comment if the linking thing feels a bit of a hassle).