Daffodil studies – working on observation skills

Daffodil studies
Shy Daff

I’ve spent some time this week on a range of daffodil studies.  

At last Friday’s meeting of the Saffron Walden Art Society, John Tookey talked about the benefits of sketching. Despite saying that drawing is not a particular strength of his, he managed to make it all look very easy. His demonstration results were impressive. Using pencil, marker pen, watercolour, and oil pastels, his landscape sketches very quickly displayed a remarkable range of tones and textures. I know that it’s not really that easy. But his point was well made: Sketching regularly hones your ability to observe and ultimately improves your painting.

I spend a lot of time experimenting – but not really on sketching. My experimenting is generally all about the colour and the texture rather than capturing the form. So with this in mind, I will start working on my sketching. There’s a sketch pad and pencils in my bag. Now I just need time.

In the meantime, although they’re a little more down my experimental path, this week I did a series of daffodil studies in different styles. I’m sure there will be more to come of this subject. I’ve got lots more images to work from and a nice collection of blossoms appearing in my garden. There’s certainly more than enough material to keep me painting daffodil studies at least as long as the sunny little flowers are in bloom. Hopefully, by the time the daffodils have faded I will be better able to capture the essence of the flower on paper.

Daffodil studies at various stages of development:

 

Picked daffodils - 3minute sketch. Daffodil studies
Picked daffodils – 3minute sketch

Done in pure watercolour. Timed to exactly three minutes. This one turned out to be semi abstract, but somehow quite appealing

Daffodil studies - trumpet frill
Daffodil study – trumpet frill

The frills on the trumpet are much more obvious on a variety that has a darker trumpet. The complexity of the frill is one of the most fascinating visual aspects of this flower.

Daffodil studies  with Daniel Smith liquid watercolour
Daffodil study with Daniel Smith liquid watercolour

Taking the frill a bit further, I added Daniel Smith Watercolour Ground to add some dimension to the blossoms.

Daffodil studies  - in Relief
Daffodil Study – in Relief

After the watercolour ground had dried ( a full 24 hours later) another layer of watercolour was applied. This is not my favourite of the studies – if feels a bit dense to me – but every one of these has been worth the time.

The watercolour sketch at the top of the page (Shy Daff) is one that was done using a reference photograph of a blossom taken in our garden. I found the angle of the stem really interesting because it’s so extreme and yet the flower is still pristine. The unusual perspective made it an ideal addition to my daffodil studies. Shy Daff is my favourite because it is simple, elegant, and doesn’t really need anything more to work all on it’s own.

4 thoughts on “Daffodil studies – working on observation skills

  1. Lovely work on the daffs – I really like the frilled one, using the blossom to create the edge of the frill 🙂 Nice work, all around.

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